Students from the Product Design Course and engineering Design Course, College of Engineering and Design, won the Kosé Award at the Asia Awards School Exhibition during TOKYO DESIGN WEEK, an annual design showcase which took place on October 24-November 3, 2015 at Meijijingu Gaien.

The award-winning SIT team named their masterpiece the “Interactive Wall,” a device which creates real-time 3D images from shadows, thus reflecting the movement of the object.

“I had always wanted to compete in Tokyo Design Week, so I spoke with Dr. Noriko Hashida, who has been heavily involved with this event. I started my project during the summer holiday,” Fumiya Hayashi, a third-year College of Engineering and Design student and one of the creators of the “Interactive Wall,” said. “I learned the methods of material processing, print design and space design and realized the importance of details. Although challenging, creating a design with members with different fields of expertise was a good experience. It would help me in the future where I would work with people who specialize in different areas,” he said.

Dr. Hashida, an active frontline designer, showcased her Minimal Chairs for the “Professional Exhibition” which displays the works by domestic and international designers in the solo-show style. Compact in size yet strikingly vivid in appearance, the Minimal Chairs attracted admirers who lingered to have a better look.

Yorozu no Hana, a life-sized kaleidoscopic device, was popular with families with children. The device was designed and assembled by a group of SIT students led by Dr. Osami Gota.

Students at their booth
Students at their booth
Dr. Hashida's Minimal Chairs
Dr. Hashida's Minimal Chairs
Yorozu no Hana
Yorozu no Hana

Meanwhile, at the “Shibuya no Tamago” exhibition at the former Shibuya Ward Government office building, Product Design students displayed their sandbags which they created with professional designers. They brought new ideas to transform the image of sandbags in construction and/or for disaster prevention – which are seen as dull and unappealing – through creative design.
“We brainstormed during workshops and picked our two best ideas. We were able to attract as many as 2 or 3 times more visitors than last year, when we had our exhibition at Shibaura Campus,” said Takuya Osawa, a Master’s student in Mechanical Engineering and the group’s team leader. “Even those who were like ‘What’s a sandbag?’ came to our pieces. I hope the show can be an eureka moment for visitors to recognize the role sandbags play in everyday life.”

“The exhibitions were successful thanks to the students’ enthusiasm. Creativity shone through their works,” Dr. Hashida, the supervisor of the Emotional Design Laboratory, said. “I hope my students will cherish the experience of working with real-life professional designers and let it inspire them to continue to try their hardest in the future.”

Redefining the donou (sandbags)
Redefining the donou (sandbags)
Aesthetically pleasing: pumpkin-shaped sandbags
Aesthetically pleasing: pumpkin-shaped sandbags